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PAWS > pub > ICD-10 > Coders

Coding and Documentation Improvement

ICD-10 matters to the coding and CDI professional because accurate code assignment is their responsibility, therefore the coder and CDI specialist must be trained and ready to assist physicians with documentation and assign ICD-10 codes on the implementation date. Coding and CDI professionals must have in-depth knowledge of ICD-10, including applying the Official Coding Guidelines and Conventions. 


Facility Coders

For successful transition to ICD10, the facility coders must:


  • Ensure they have sufficient foundational knowledge of human anatomy and physiology
  • Learn how to apply both ICD-10-CM and ICD-10- PCS codes correctly on inpatient encounters
  • Understand how to apply maps and crosswalks between ICD-9-CM and the ICD10 systems
  • Correctly apply ICD-10-CM codes and CPT procedure codes for outpatient encounters

Professional Fee Coders

For successful transition to ICD10, the pro fee coders must:


  • Ensure they have sufficient foundational knowledge of human anatomy and physiology
  • Understand how to apply maps and crosswalks between ICD-9-CM and the ICD10 systems
  • Correctly apply ICD-10-CM codes and CPT procedure codes for provider encounters

Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists

“Clinical documentation improvement (CDI) will be as affected as coding, if not more so. The true challenge in the transition to ICD-10 is ensuring that documentation meets the level of specificity and granularity required to achieve optimal reimbursement, meets all regulatory and reporting requirements, and accurately reflects the level of care provided.


Documentation practices will be the No. 1 driver for success in ICD-10. There will be significant changes required in clinical documentation, specifically in the areas of disease specificity, anatomical site and laterality, complication and manifestations, obstetrics, and correct use of medical terminology and naming. Providers must adhere to these changes to increase the specificity of the codes as well as decrease the potential for coding errors and unpaid claims that could impact reimbursement or quality of care.” (ICD Monitor)


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